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Water War / Water Warfare Pressurized Reservoir Blaster Usage .:

By: iSoaker.com

Sample blasters:
SS30, SS50, XP20, XP40, XP75, XXP175

Firing Angle Limitations

Due to the design of the water reservoir-to-nozzle route, this type of blaster has the most limited firing angles. The reasoning behind these angles should be understood since trying to fire the blaster at an angle greater than recommended will result in a mist of water being ejected from the blaster. Note: Angles are approximations and may vary slightly between different water blasters. Improper firing is the quickest way to depressurize the water blaster and leave one defenseless.

Firing Angles

Accepting the Limitations

Pressurized reservoir water blasters have the worst pressurizing time and lowest 3/4-strength stream time. With this in mind, shots fired should be as short and accurate as possible. Also, as the reservoir water level drops, it requires many more pumps to maintain pressure. If these short-comings are remembered and compensated for, the pressurized reservoir water blaster can still perform decently against even a CPS user.

Maximizing Use

Always pump between shots. Effective range really depends on the pressure within the water reservoir. More pressure means more range and output. On blasters where there is no method of determining exact air pressure, it can be difficult to determine when to stop. A good rule of thumb is to stop when pumping becomes significantly more difficult.

Depressurize Before Reloading

Since the pressure tank is also the water reservoir, it is very important to depressurize the blaster by pulling the trigger until nothing more comes out before opening the reservoir. Opening a pressurized tank may not only lead to some water being sprayed but may also damage the O-rings which keep the reservoir adapter sealed. If this seal is damaged, the blaster will no longer function as well if at all.

Posted: 19990622 | Page Last Updated: 20040115